Monday, September 25th 2017

Archive for November, 2007

Nov
2007
30

Transcendental Movies: Our Top 9 List

Introducing the highly-experiential, officially-unscientific Soul’s Code list of the most transcendental movies in recent cinema history, starting with the Tom Hanks vehicle, Cast Away (in ascending order). Almost all of these titles share a theme of personal transformation and identity-morphing resurrection. We love using pop culture...
Nov
2007
30

No. 9: Cast Away

Given its deficit of dialogue and, like, characters, it’s amazing that this 2000 millennial flick did more than $230 million in U.S. domestic box office. Cast Away translates that famous critique of philosopher Blaise Pascal’s into a modern scenario: the misery sewn by western man derives from his inability to sit quietly in an empty ...
Nov
2007
30

No. 8: Peaceful Warrior

Nick Nolte in a major spiritual cinematic release? Whodda thunk it? But the one-time action hero (“Farewell to the King,” “Extreme Prejudice,” “North Dallas Forty”) and DUI’d party animal pulls off the role of a modern shaman disguised as a service station custodian with convincing presence. The...
Nov
2007
30

No. 7: Seven Years in Tibet

Based on the memoir of the same name by Austrian mountaineer, Heinrich Harrer (1912 -2006), the movie traces the meltdown of the ultimate western ego by the mystical ether that was the Dalai Lama’s Tibet. Brad Pitt plays Harrer, a Nazi poster-boy who embarks on a publicity stunt to scale a Himalayan peak, a point ...
Nov
2007
30

No. 6: I Heart Huckabees

Metaphysical bon mots ricochet like ping-pong balls between the characters played by the dream-team cast of Jude Law, Dustin Hoffman, Naomi Watts, Lily Tomlin and French star Isabelle Huppert in this screwball-paced comedy. Brought to you by Three Kings war-caper director, David O’Russell, our favorite bit of dialogue goes: Tommy: Did you...
Nov
2007
30

No. 5: Little Buddha

Think of this movie as the “French Lieutenant’s Woman” of spiritual cinema in that it toggles back and forth between two stories. One narrative is set in modern-day America: the search is on for the next Dalai Lama, and monks vet a caucasion kid in Seattle who just may be The One. Those scenes are ...
Nov
2007
30

No. 4: Brother Sun, Sister Moon

Another Italian master, Franco Zefferelli, devotes 120 minutes of celluloid to a subject closer to home: the life of Umbrian saint, Francis of Assisi, the most revered male figure in Christianity next to Jesus himself. A period piece that reflects the halo of a fading hippie counterculture, this 1972 biopic catches up to young Francis, ...
Nov
2007
30

No. 3: Groundhog Day

A sly marriage of a romantic comedy with spiritual cinema, this mainstream hit casts Bill Murray as a cynical narcissist. His gig as a weatherman for a regional TV channel has gone to his head. By some fluke of relativity, he is forced to re-live the same day — again and again — in a ...
Nov
2007
30

No. 2: 2001 A Space Odyssey

Arguably the most influential sci-fi movie ever, this abstract cinematic essay was penned by two visionaries: director Stanley Kubrick and science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke. Its central message is that a supreme intelligence is behind the leaps that have informed the evolution of human consciousness. The widely-copied...
Nov
2007
30

No. 1: Kundun

This movie executes itself like a Mousetrap for mediation — or an induction into a state of profound compassion for one’s Self and *all* beings. So it may surprise you that Kundun is the product of Martin Scorcese, more familiar to an admiring intelligentsia and media as Hollywood’s reigning monarch of mob violence. A classic ...